Friday, March 12, 2010

Inflammatory Statement Number Five: I Believe in Sobriety

Gosh, so many to pick from. Spanking? Family heirlooms? Gay people?

But I'm going to go with... sobriety.

Sort of.

There doesn't seem to be a word for eschewing banned substances.

I think cigarettes are gross, and that smokers should have to pay an entirely different rate of insurance than non-smokers. But cigarettes are legal, they don't impair your driving ability or cause you to make especially poor decisions, and so I'm pretty much ok with them, though I do think bars should be smoke-free because I hate stinking like smoke when I don't.

Alcohol... I'm cool with it. In moderation. It's legal, it's historic, and man, a fine red goes a long way towards putting me in a good mood.

I am completely aware that a similar argument can be made for marijuana, the most socially acceptable of illicit substances. Practically everyone I know has toked up at some point. It's historic, it puts people in a good mood, it's illegal for reasons I don't pretend to understand, because I'm pretty sure we all agree that alcohol is more commonly dangerous than marijuana. For those reasons, I would support its legalization.

But I don't believe in smoking weed. Or taking prescription drugs, or uppers, or downers, or-- naturally-- crack, heroin, meth, and all the other drugs a nice white girl from Virginia doesn't know about. But I suspect that most people don't agree with the latter, and many think that smoking pot is a-ok.

I don't.

It's not the most rational belief. For instance, if you have cancer? Light up, my friend, whatever helps. But on a personal level?

For whatever reason, weed IS illegal, and one should only venture outside the law for a cause that matters. Getting relaxed or hungry or in a better mood or whatever doesn't strike me as one. So I believe in taking hot baths with fat-bellied glasses of red wine instead of smoking a doobie.

Plus, it seems intrinsically linked to adolescence in my mind. So when I hear my parenting peers tell me that they light up after the kids are in bed and get high with their babysitter, I think less of them. Just like I think less of men who play video games and women who wear their teenage girls' clothes. It's just not dignified.

Maybe the title should have been "I believe in dignity."



(I have been getting the images for these posts by image-searching Google. When you image-search for dignity, it's mostly Hilary Duff, and old people in euthanasia articles.)


6 comments:

smartinof4steve said...

hmmm.

On this one I don't fully agree with my s-m.

I'm an admitted light weight, smoked for a period in 7th grade, still have a tolerance of about 2 beers, and if I was in the boy scouts I could wear the "illegal substance virgin" badge.

This has to do with two things I strongly believe:

1) Anybody can do whatever they want. It's their business.
2) No one has the right to impose their ELECTIVE shitty-ness on others.

I don't care if you are a drug addict, like to hit things, yell at things, do dangerous things, etc.

IF you can do these things without hurting other people, their feelings, their bodies, their expectations of you as a friend/parent/child/sibling/human being, have at it.

For me those things would probably &%$@# up things for my family and friends, and that's not something I'm willing to chance. My expectations, of me, for them, won't allow for it.

(And honestly, there are so many fun things to do, that are legal in most states, why would you choose something else with such a big potential downside?)

(grin)

-k

Anonymous said...

Said Kagan:

"I don't care if you are a drug addict-----IF you can do these things without hurting other people, their feelings, their bodies, their expectations of you as a friend/parent/child/sibling/human "-----
These two statements are mutually exclusive---by definition, drug--or alcohol---addicts hurt other people,particularly those who love them and most especially, innocent children.

I think the point Alexe was making was she personally doesn't approve of pot and ,i think, because it is illegal. A valid viewpoint. Altho' I would remind her she used to buy non-USDA approved eggs, which I think the USDA is mighty close to calling illegal.Just give them time---if it ain't Monsanto, it ain't good.
(PS--smokers DO pay more in insurance.)

Angela said...

I think if you're a parent, a lot of things that were formerly okay become unacceptable.

Ace and I went to a very lovely wedding in Oxford where 40-50 year old adults with children were acting like effing kids and sneaking behind the very lovely venue to smoke out. I lost respect for a lot of people. They were just so...stupid.

Look, I am no angel. I did ALL that stuff...when I was 22. You're a grown up. You have children. Time not to act like a dumbass.

Anonymous said...

you live in an elite fantasy world.

Moonpie said...

first, to all you 'anonymous' posters - grow a pair and put your name on here. second, i absolutely agree with K on this one - you can do 'drugs' and not hurt people - if they don't KNOW about it. What you do is your own business as long as you are not hurting anyone else. third, (to angela), I did all 'that stuff' when i was 15 and bought a HOUSE at 22. What or who defines when someone should 'grow up'? By MY standards, you shouldn't have been acting like a 'dumbass' at 22.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous # 1 is me, Alexe's mom,aka M.I.L.--sorry, Natalie I don't blog and so have no name.
I think we are mixing apples and oranges---i do not think just because you smoke dope once and awhile ,or did and now don't,you are a "drug addict."
A drug addict has given over power over their life to the addiction-to the point where it harms them and those around them.
And I have to say,that once you bring children into the mix, life changes---whether or not you are a "drug addict", it is simply not appropriate or dignified to be sneaking off in the bushes to smoke or toking it up with the babysitter---
or driving while stoned.
My belief.Or as anonymous #2 would have it, my "elite fantasy world." One where adults are responsible.